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For What Are You Thankful?



Among the myriad of things for which I’m thankful, at this moment, it’s the two movie reviews I just read on Crosswalk.com. Freelancer, Michael Foust, writes about Frozen II[1] and A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood.[2] Both should be wildly popular at the box office, but for different reasons, and with different messages. Frozen II, while appealing to our “baby” generation, promotes the elements of witchcraft, fire, water, wind, and earth. And, using animism, gives each a soul and a spirit body.

Although Frozen II teaches courage in the face of adversity, it also conveys an antichristian source for Elsa’s courage/power, and this puts me in a bit of a predicament. As a long-distance grandma, I promised my granddaughters. I would buy them tickets to see the movie. They saw the first Frozen, and yes, it does have a bit of animism—Olaf, the walking and talking snowman. But Foust says Frozen II is darker. I’m not surprised, and in my opinion, it’s deliberately darker, so they can slowly capture our children’s hearts and minds. I’m concerned this movie may push my granddaughters over the top. Their faith in God, who is the True power,[3] could be deactivated, defused like a stick of dynamite. This is Satan’s ultimate goal because the Gospel IS the power—the Greek word dunamis [dynamite]—of God.[4]

On the other hand, A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, a story in the life of ordained Presbyterian Pastor, Fred Rogers, of Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood fame, focuses on the fruits of the Spirit,[5] according to Foust. The one preview I saw showed Mr. Rogers kneeling by his bed in prayer. These are the things I want my grandchildren to see and remember. However, I guarantee my granddaughters won’t ask to attend this movie. Their ages are 4, 8, and 10.

Our son, their dad, thinks I’m crazy for being concerned with what Frozen II communicates, and maybe some of you are with him. Nevertheless, I know the creators of these types of movies have agendas fueled by the prince of this world. So what’s a grandma to do?

PRAY! I’m so thankful I’m a child of the Living God[6] that He allows me to come boldly to His throne.[7] And because of this, you might think I’m writing about prayer today, but you would be wrong. It’s the season of Thanksgiving. Let's talk about the word, thankful.

Did you know the majority of Bible words translated thank, thanks, thankful, or thanking are the Hebrew word yâdâh pronounced yaw-daw’?[8] It means literally to use (i.e. hold out) the hand…especially to revere or worship (with extended hands). There is a second word, tôwdâh, pronounced to-daw’, derived from yâdâh[9] and properly meaning, an extension of the hand…adoration, specifically a choir of worshippers, and translated as (sacrifice of) praise, thanks (-giving, offering).

I love these words! They remind me of author and speaker, Liz Curtis Higgs, stomping her foot, throwing her hands forward, and shouting, “Ta-da!!”[10]

I think King David expressed thankfulness with this same exuberance. When he finally brought the Ark of the Covenant to Jerusalem, his joy was uncontainable. Earlier, David had written a psalm of thanksgiving to be sung as they traveled. It is documented in I Chronicles 16, but its influence is felt throughout Scripture.

“On that day David first delivered this psalm into the hand of Asaph and his brethren, to thank [yâdâh] the Lord:  Oh, give thanks to the Lord! Call upon His name; make known His deeds among the peoples! Sing to Him, sing psalms to Him; talk of all His wondrous works! Glory in His holy name; let the hearts of those rejoice who seek the Lord! …Oh, give thanks to the Lord, for He is good! For His mercy endures forever.”[11]

Scripture uses a few other “thank” words, yet each is associated with yâdâh. And all, in some way, bear the meaning of a lifted hand, a choir, a shout, an acclamation, or a sacrifice of praise. No wonder David also wrote, “Let my prayer be set before You as incense, the lifting up of my hands as the evening sacrifice.”[12]

Oh, that we would be so in love with our Savior, that like David, we’d lift our hands, shout and sing thanks—yâdâhtôwdâh—to God uninhibited. And then, teach our children and grandchildren to do the same.[13]

Have a thankful and blessed Thanksgiving!



[1] https://www.crosswalk.com/culture/features/things-parents-should-know-about-frozen-2.html
[2] https://www.crosswalk.com/culture/features/things-you-should-know-about-a-beautiful-day-in-the-neighborhood.html
[3] Ephesians 1:17-21
[4] Romans 1:16
[5] Galatians 2:22-23
[6] John 1:12
[7] Hebrews 4:14-16; Hebrews 10:19-22
[8] Strong’s #3034
[9] Strong’s #8426
[10] https://www.lizcurtishiggs.com/lets-all-say-ta-da/
[11] I Chronicles 16:7-10, 34
[12] Psalm 141:2
[13] Deuteronomy 11:19

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